Worldview Security Report – March 27, 2019
27-Mar-19

MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Algeria (Security threat level – 4): On 26 March 2019, Algeria’s army chief of staff Gen. Ahmed Gaid Salah called for President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to be officially declared unfit to rule in accordance with the country’s constitution. According to Article 102 of the constitution, the Constitutional Council may remove the president from office if he is unable to perform his duties. The leader of Algeria’s upper house of parliament will then act as interim president for at least 45 days and no more than 90 days. After the 90-day period expires, officials must organize new elections. Members of Algeria’s opposition criticized Salah’s statement, declaring it insufficient to meet popular demand, and instead called for immediate free and fair elections.

In a related development, approximately 6,000 protesters gathered in downtown Algiers to call for the resignation of President Bouteflika. The protesters were primarily students. There were no reports of violence.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Comoros (Security threat level – 3): On 27 March 2019, the U.S. Embassy in Antananarivo issued a Security Alert for Comoros, which reads in part as follows:

  • “Location: Throughout the three islands of the Union of the Comoros
  • “Event: The Union of the Comoros has experienced demonstrations, civil unrest, and roadblocks impacting travel since the March 24 elections. Chief of Mission official and personal travel to the Comoros is restricted until further notice except for mission-critical travel deemed essential by the Deputy Chief of Mission.”
  • Mauritius (Security threat level – 1): On 27 March 2019, the U.K. Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) issued updated travel advice for Mauritius, which reads in part as follows:

  • “The Mauritian authorities have removed the cyclone warning for the island of Rodrigues. However, conditions are still poor, with strong winds and high waves and much of the island remains without power. You should continue to monitor and follow the advice of the Mauritius Meteorological Services. ”
  • Mozambique (Security threat level – 3): On 27 March 2019, the U.K. Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) issued updated travel advice for Mozambique, which reads in part as follows:

  • “Tropical Cyclone Idai made landfall at the port city of Beira on Thursday 14 March. The cyclone has devastated critical infrastructure in the provinces of Sofala, Zambezia, Manica and Tete, including electricity, communication and road networks. Access to the affected areas remains challenging. Many roads and bridges in the affected areas are impassable. Extensive flooding still exists. You should continue to monitor local and international weather updates from the World Meteorological Organisation and follow any advice given by the local authorities. See our Tropical cyclones page for advice about what to do if you are caught up in a storm.
  • “Following Tropical Cyclone Idai there is an increased risk of typhoid fever and cholera in a number of areas of the country. The situation is being monitored by the World Health Organisation.”
  • New Zealand (Security threat level – 1): On 26 March 2019, the U.K. Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) issued updated travel advice for New Zealand, which reads in part as follows: “Due to extreme weather conditions a Civil Defence Emergency was declared on New Zealand’s West Coast on 26 March 2019. State Highway 6 is closed between Hokitika and Makarora. Anyone considering travel to the West Coast should check the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) website and the Civil Defence West Coast Facebook page.”
    Venezuela (Security threat level – 4): On 26 March 2019, the U.K. Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) issued updated travel advice for Venezuela, which reads in part as follows: “A prolonged and widespread power cut affected Caracas and much of the rest of Venezuela on 25 to 26 March. Power has returned to parts of Caracas, though supply remains fragile. Caracas International Airport has also been affected. Mobile signals and internet are working intermittently. The British Embassy Caracas will remain closed until the power supply is fully restored.”


    Security threat levels range from 1 (Very Low) to 5 (Very High) and are determined using a comprehensive system that utilizes both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The primary factors used to determine a location’s security threat level are Armed Conflict, Crime, Demonstrations/Strikes, Ethnic/Sectarian Tensions, Graft/Corruption, Kidnapping, Political Instability, Government Restriction and Terrorism.