February 12, 2021

AMERICAS

Haiti (Security threat level – 4) : On 10 February 2021, opposition leaders announced plans to hold nationwide anti-government protests on 14 February. The demonstrations are part of an effort to pressure President Jovenel Moise to resign so that Joseph Mécène Jean-Louis, the opposition’s designated transitional president, can assume control of the government. Although opposition leaders have called for the protest to proceed peacefully, security forces have deployed live ammunition and tear gas to disperse recent demonstrations.

United States (Security threat level – 2): On 11 February 2021, the governor of the U.S. state of Nevada, where the resort city of Las Vegas is located, announced plans to ease coronavirus-related restrictions beginning on 15 February. According to the announcement, nonessential businesses — such as indoor shopping malls, recreational facilities and retail stores — may resume operations at 50% of maximum occupancy, while occupancy limits for casinos, gyms, places of worship and restaurants will increase to 35% from 25%. The limit on public gatherings will increase to 100 people from 50. Indoor private gatherings will remain limited to 10 individuals, but outdoor private gatherings will be allowed to host up to 25 attendees. Provided that daily new cases of COVID-19 and hospitalization numbers continue to decline in the state, the governor plans to allow gatherings of up to 250 people for events such as conferences, conventions and trade shows as of 15 March.

While the statewide mask mandate and social distancing rules will remain in place, the governor plans to cede control of most coronavirus-related restrictions to local governments in the state as of 1 May. Details regarding the state’s phased reopening plan are available here.

ASIA

Myanmar (Security threat level – 4): On 12 February 2021, widespread protests denouncing the military takeover of the government continued in cities nationwide. In Yangon, demonstrators rallied at Hledan Junction, Myaynigone Junction, Sule Pagoda and Kabar Aye Pagoda Road near the Myanmar Plaza shopping mall. Smaller protests also occurred outside the United Nations office on Natmauk Road and outside the Russian and Chinese embassies. Additionally, reports indicate that police officers deployed rubber bullets to disperse demonstrators in the city of Mawlamyine, which is located near Bilu Island approximately 300 km (185 mi) east of Yangon, injuring at least three people. Demonstrations also occurred in Mandalay, the capital Naypyitaw, Dawei, and Myitkyna in Kachin state.

AUSTRALASIA

Australia (Security threat level – 2): As of 2359 local time (1259 UTC) on 12 February 2021, international flights to and from the state of Victoria are suspended until 2359 local time on 17 February. During this period, stage four restrictions — which include a stay-at-home order — will be in effect. Residents may travel within 5 km (3 mi) from their homes and only for essential reasons such as acquiring necessary goods, caregiving or other essential work. Face masks are mandatory in all public areas. Nonessential businesses will be closed, and most gatherings will be banned. For an exhaustive list of restrictions, please click here and select the “Table of Restrictions” file at the bottom of the page. The decision follows the discovery of a cluster of cases of a more contagious COVID-19 variant from the U.K. related to a quarantine hotel, which also includes several workers at Melbourne Airport (YMML/MEL).

EUROPE

Austria (Security threat level – 2): On 12 February 2021, authorities declared the western state of Tyrol a restricted zone until at least 22 February due to the spread of a South African variant of COVID-19. Individuals may only leave the state if they present a negative COVID-19 test taken within the preceding 48 hours. Anyone who fails to comply with the test requirement may be fined up to 1,450 euros (1,750 U.S. dollars). Exemptions are in place for cross-border commuters. An estimated 1,000 police officers and military personnel are stationed at the state’s border checkpoints, including at border crossings with Germany and Italy. German officials announced that the German border will be closed to Tyrol residents beginning on 14 February.

Cyprus (Security threat level – 2): A protest march is scheduled to occur at 1600 local time (1400 UTC) on 13 February 2021, beginning at Kolokasi Park in the capital city Nicosia. The march is sponsored by several non-profit organizations with a variety of demands for the government, including an end to government corruption and gathering restrictions. The event is expected to last for three hours. Police officials issued a statement on 12 February to remind protest organizers that large public gatherings remain banned and that violators will be subject to penalties.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Ecuador (Security threat level – 3): On 11 February 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice for Ecuador, which reads in part as follows: “Following the first round of presidential elections of February 2021, there have been announcements of protests across Ecuador, led by the political party Pachakutik. This may cause disruption and demonstrations across the country, potentially including road blockages in various provinces. In light of the unpredictable and rapidly changing situation, you should remain vigilant, avoid any protests or demonstrations and keep up to date with developments via official local sources (ECU 911 emergency services ) and this travel advice. You should also be wary of unverified, unofficial information and allow extra time to reach your destination. Check the state of roads. ”

Haiti (Security threat level – 4): On 11 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince issued a Security Alert, which reads in part as follows: “This year, the annual Carnival celebration begins on Sunday, February 14 and concludes on Wednesday, February 17. During Carnival, it is customary for crowds of varying size and accompanying Ra-Ra bands to hold spontaneous celebrations throughout the country. Ra-Ra bands will be out in the streets with increased frequency in the days prior to and during Carnival itself. Band members and onlookers may crowd around vehicles, block them in, bang on windows, crack bull whips, display knives and machetes, and make other overtly aggressive actions. It can be a potentially unsettling situation, but generally speaking, crowds remain non-violent.”

Russia (Security threat level – 3): On 12 February 2021, the U.S. mission in Russia issued a Demonstration Alert that reads in part as follows: “Media sources indicate that on Sunday, February 14, demonstrators are planning to gather on Old Arbat in Moscow at 2 PM. The location of the demonstration may move, and streets may be closed in the surrounding area. There may be similar unauthorized demonstrations in other cities.

“U.S. citizens should avoid this demonstration and any related activities. Recent, unauthorized demonstrations have seen a heavy police presence and a large number of arrests.

“Given the possibility of crowds, you should be aware of guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus, which includes avoiding large crowds, distancing yourself from others, and wearing cloth face coverings in public settings.”

 

Slovenia (Security threat level – 2): On 12 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Ljubljana issued a Health Alert, which reads in part as follows: “Given the improved epidemiological situation in Slovenia, the Slovenian government announced the following loosening of restrictions, effective 15 February:

  • Entry/Borders: You may now enter the country without quarantine if you have proof of a vaccination, proof of recovery from a prior Covid infection, or (as before) a negative Covid test result. Border crossings from Italy, Austria, and Hungary are no longer restricted to specific crossing points.
  • Gatherings: Gatherings of 10 people or fewer are now permitted with proper precautions, such as masks.
  • Internal travel: Restrictions on movement between regions have been eliminated. Curfew (2100-0600) remains in effect
  • Stores: Open. Restaurants or bars remained closed for in-person dining. Employees of businesses that have reopened may present proof of a test within seven days, instead of a daily test.
  • Ski resorts: Open. Users must show a negative Covid test result taken within the last seven days. (See testing centers).
  • Schools: All primary school students, and high school students in their final year, can return to school.

“For additional information from the Slovenian government, including reaching their call center, see their English-language Covid page. “

February 11, 2021

AMERICAS

Peru (Security threat level – 3): On 10 February 2021, authorities extended lockdowns in metropolitan Lima and the regions of Lima, Ancash, Pasco, Huanuco, Junin, Huancavelica, Ica, Apurímac and Callao until 28 February in an effort to curb a second wave of COVID-19 infections. A nightly curfew from 2000 to 0400 local time (0100 to 0900 UTC) is in effect, and only one person from each household is allowed to travel once a day for a maximum of one hour. All nonessential businesses are closed, including gyms and casinos. Essential businesses, such as supermarkets and pharmacies, are allowed to operate at 40% capacity. Interprovincial air and ground travel in the aforementioned regions is banned.

ASIA

India (Security threat level – 3): On 11 February 2021, police officers in Kolkata – the capital of West Bengal state – deployed tear gas, water cannons and baton charges against protesters in the city’s Esplanade neighborhood after the demonstrators, who were primarily from left-wing political parties, breached several barricades while attempting to reach the State Secretariat building. A spokesperson for the protesters claimed that 150 of them suffered injuries during the unrest, although that could not be confirmed. Following the violence, protest leaders announced that they will hold a statewide bandh (strike) during 0600-1800 local time (0030-1230 UTC) on 12 February.

EUROPE

Belgium / Germany / Spain / Portugal (Security threat levels – 3 / 3 / 3 / 2): On 11 February 2021, Belgian officials extended the ban on nonessential travel to and from the country until at least 1 April. Exceptions are in place for individuals with family emergencies, as well as for those with travel plans for business or for study. Cross-border residents will be permitted to traverse the border for a maximum of 48 hours without being subject to a quarantine. The travel ban originally went into effect on 27 January.

German authorities on 10 February extended coronavirus-related restrictions until 7 March. Under the rules, restaurants are limited to takeout and delivery only; cultural centers, entertainment venues and nonessential businesses remain closed; and residents may only meet with one other person from outside their household at a time. Hair salons will be allowed to reopen on 1 March, and if the virus incidence rate falls below 35 new cases per 100,000 people over a seven-day period, then museums, galleries and some nonessential businesses may reopen prior to 7 March.

The Spanish minister of health on 9 February extended existing coronavirus-related restrictions through 2 March on passengers arriving on flights and ships from Brazil, South Africa and the U.K., as the government of Spain aims to curb the spread of new COVID-19 variants. Under the current limitations, only citizens or residents of Spain or Andorra are allowed to enter Spain from Brazil, South Africa and the U.K., and only after obtaining a negative result from a PCR COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Separately, the Spanish government extended its land border closure with Portugal until 1 March.

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Nigeria (Security threat level – 5): On 11 February 2021, rival groups of the National Union of Transport Workers (NURTW) armed with guns and swords clashed in the Obalende area of Lagos Island in the city of Lagos. Reports indicate that fighting occurred from the Kam Selem House on Moloney street to the Ministry of Communications building on Lewis street over control of a parking lot, although the specific cause of the clash remains unknown. Unverified reports claim that dozens of people sustained minor injuries and that several properties were damaged.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Libya (Security threat level – 5): On 10 February 2021, the U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) issued an updated Maritime Advisory, which reads in part as follows:

“1. Issues: The ongoing conflict in Libya continues to pose a potential risk to U.S. flagged commercial vessels transiting near coastal Libya. Threats may come from a variety of different sources including, but not limited to: missiles, rockets, artillery, mines, small arms, aircraft, and unmanned aerial vehicles. These threats pose a direct risk to all commercial vessels operating in the area.

“2. Guidance: Vessels operating in this area are advised to review security measures, ensure AIS is transmitting always (except when transmitting creates a threat to the safety or security of the ship or where a security incident is imminent, consistent with provisions of SOLAS and U.S. law), and monitor VHF Channel 16.

“a) Vessels at anchor, operating in restricted maneuvering environments, or proceeding at slow speeds should be especially vigilant. U.S. flagged commercial vessels transiting the conflict area should conduct a risk assessment and incorporate appropriate protective measures into their vessel security plans.

“b) To afford best protection in the region, U.S. flagged commercial vessels are encouraged to check in with the NATO Shipping Center upon entering the Mediterranean Sea. In the event of any incident or suspicious activity, call the NATO Shipping Center and activate the Ship Security Alert System immediately. Mariners are also encouraged to review the “Central Mediterranean” section of the NATO Shipping Center website at https://mc.nato.int/nsc/operations/news/2020/threat-to-commercial-shipping-operating-in-the-mediterranean-2.”

To read the full text of the advisory, please click here.

Senegal (Security threat level – 3): On 11 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Dakar issued a Demonstration Alert regarding planned protests, which reads in part as follows: “Location: Various neighborhoods throughout Dakar, Senegal, including:

  • VDN
  • FANN
  • Universite Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD)
  • Plateau

“Event: Planned demonstrations are expected to take place over the next several days, with the possibility of additional spontaneous demonstrations. The demonstrators intend to protest in response to increased political tensions. Demonstrations may occur on major roadways in and around the areas mentioned above, resulting in increased traffic delays. The Government of Senegal is providing police presence when demonstrations occur.”

February 10, 2021

AMERICAS

Costa Rica (Security threat level – 3): On 8 February 2021, the opposition National Rescue Movement (NRM) group announced that it plans to stage protest actions, including demonstrations and roadblocks, on 15 February to denounce the government’s recent financial agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Further details regarding the anticipated protest actions have yet to emerge. Protests led by the NRM disrupted transit on major highways throughout Costa Rica for several weeks in October 2020 before the government fulfilled the demands of various regional protest groups.

Jamaica (Security threat level – 3): As of 10 February 2021, an ongoing nationwide coronavirus-related nightly curfew will begin two hours earlier at 2000 local time (0100 UTC) and last until 0500 local time. The new hours of curfew are set to be in effect until at least 24 February. The nightly curfew was previously in effect from 2200 to 0500 local time. Additionally, public gatherings are now restricted to 10 attendees from the previous allowance of up to 15 attendees. Prime Minister Andrew Holness enhanced the existing measures after authorities recorded approximately 2,000 new COVID-19 cases over the previous seven days.

United States (Security threat level – 2): Shortly before 1100 local time (1600 UTC) on 9 February 2021, a 67-year-old local man opened fire at the Allina health clinic in the town of Buffalo, Minnesota, located approximately 40 mi (65 km) northwest of the city of Minneapolis. Approximately 30 minutes after the shooting, at least one explosive device reportedly detonated inside the facility as officials were searching for additional victims. Five people were shot and wounded; one of the victims later succumbed to their wounds. Three others remain in critical but stable condition at a hospital. Police officers detained the gunman at the scene. The detainee had been angry about health care services that he received and might have been treated at the facility in the past. The man has a criminal history, most of which was due to driving while intoxicated. Law enforcement officials are currently conducting an investigation to establish a definitive motive for the attack.

ASIA

Indonesia (Security threat level – 4): On 8 February 2021, authorities extended an existing entry ban for all foreign travelers until 22 February in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. Exemptions to the ban exist for travelers who are legal permanent residents, those from countries with reciprocal entry agreements, and anyone who receives permission from the government. Travelers must still fulfill all coronavirus-related entry requirements, such as displaying proof of results from a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to departure and undergo a mandatory quarantine at government-designated hotels for five days after entry.

Myanmar (Security threat level – 4): On 10 February 2021, large-scale protests against the 1 February military coup occurred in cities across Myanmar for a fifth consecutive day. Protests occurred in a number of locations in Yangon, the country’s largest city, including in front of the Chinese and Japanese embassies and a U.N. office. Several hundred protesters also marched in the vicinity of Hledan Junction Skyway, and workers of the Ministry of Electric Power took part in a countrywide civil disobedience movement against the junta regime. In Mandalay, security personnel placed roadblocks in an unsuccessful attempt to prevent protesters from gathering in the city, although multiple large-scale protests occurred. In the capital Naypyitaw, several hundred workers from multiple ministries and other state entities joined the civil disobedience movement. Military personnel raided a medical clinic located in the Thabyay Kone area, where staff members had joined the civil disobedience. Meanwhile, in the eastern Kayah state, located approximately 285 km (180 mi) northeast of Yangon, a group of uniformed police officers reportedly joined a protest march in Laikaw, the state capital. The gatherings were relatively peaceful compared to those from the previous day.

In a related development, aviation officials issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) for Yangon International Airport (VYYY/RGN) due to Air Traffic Control (ATC) staff members participating in the civil disobedience, causing disruptions at the airport.

Thailand (Security threat level – 3): On 10 February 2021, police officers deployed tear gas to disperse protesters who had gathered near Pathumwan police station in the capital Bangkok. Authorities also reportedly arrested at least 10 people, although an undisclosed number were released later. Protesters gathered after four protest leaders were denied bail after previously being charged with violating the country’s strict lèse-majesté laws, which prohibit the defaming or threatening of members of the royal family.

AUSTRALASIA

New Zealand / Fiji / South Pacific Islands (Security threat levels – 1 / 2 / 1): At 1319 UTC on 10 February 2021, a 7.7 magnitude earthquake struck at a depth of 33 km (20 mi) southeast of New Caledonia’s Loyalty Islands province, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). There were no reports of damage or casualties in New Caledonia or elsewhere. However, the U.S. Tsunami Warning Center issued guidance indicating that tsunami waves of between 0.3 and 1 meter (1-3 ft) above tide levels are possible within three hours along coastal areas of Fiji, New Zealand and Vanuatu. Waves of less than 0.3 meters above tide levels are also possible for parts of American Samoa, Australia, French Polynesia, the Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Wallis and Futuna.

EUROPE

United Kingdom (Security threat level – 3): On 9 February 2021, the U.K. health secretary declared that all travelers arriving in England as of 15 February will be required to take two additional COVID-19 tests — on day 2 and day 8 — during their mandatory 10-day self-quarantine. A requirement to provide proof of negative results from a COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours before their departure is already in place. All travelers are also required to complete and submit a Passenger Locator Form. In addition, beginning on 15 February, U.K. nationals, foreigners with residency rights in the U.K. and Irish nationals arriving from 33 countries deemed high-risk for COVID-19 — including Panama and Portugal, along with countries in South America and southern Africa — will be required to self-isolate in government-designated hotels for 10 days. Those travelers will need to purchase a quarantine package, the anticipated cost of which is less than 1,750 British pounds (nearly 2,420 U.S. dollars). Violators of the quarantine requirement could face a fine of up to 10,000 pounds or up to 10 years imprisonment. Foreign nationals who have visited or transited through the high-risk countries within the past 10 days are already prohibited from entry. Additional details regarding measures that are set to be effective as of 15 February are available here.

Meanwhile, the Scottish government will require all passengers arriving at Scottish airports from outside the Common Travel Area (U.K., Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man) as of 15 February to self-quarantine at government-designated hotels for 10 days. Passengers will also be required to take two additional COVID-19 tests — one on day 2 and another on day 8. The cost of the quarantine is the same as in England and includes the cost of COVID-19 tests. Further information as outlined by the Scottish government is available here.

MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Saudi Arabia (Security threat level – 3): On 10 February 2021, authorities in Saudi Arabia announced that the Houthi rebel group in neighboring Yemen launched an attack against Abha International Airport (OEAB/AHB), which is located approximately 100 km (65 mi) northwest of the country’s border with Yemen. Reports indicate that an Airbus A-320 operated by the budget airline flyadeal caught fire during the attack, but emergency personnel extinguished the blaze. There were no reports of casualties and airport operations were not disrupted. Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for the attack, claiming that they used armed drones. Houthi officials allege that the Saudi air force is using the facility to launch airstrikes into Yemen.

Analyst Comment: Houthi rebels routinely launch armed drone and missile attacks into Saudi Arabia, including Abha International Airport. For example, in June 2019, a Houthi cruise missile attack on the arrivals hall at Abha International Airport injured 47 people. The airport facility remains vulnerable to future attacks.

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Mali (Security threat level – 5) : On 10 February 2021, suspected Islamist militants launched an attack against a military base housing U.N. Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) personnel near the town of Kéréna, located in the central Mopti region. Peacekeeping soldiers at the base responded and repelled the attack, during which at least 20 peacekeepers were injured. While Islamist militant groups linked to al-Qaeda and the Islamic State frequently perpetrate such attacks, no group has thus far claimed responsibility.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Chad (Security threat level – 5): On 10 February 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice regarding adjusted curfew hours, which reads in part as follows: “There are quarantine measures in the capital N’Djamena and provincial capitals, restricting entry and exit.

“The Government has changed the curfew hours. The curfew hours in N’Djamena and 9 provinces (Guera, Kanem, Logone Occidental, Logone Oriental, Mayo-Kebbi Ouest, Mayo-Kebbi Est, Moyen Chari, Batha and Ennedi Est) and in the districts of Mandelia, Logone-Gana and N’Djamena Farah are from 9pm to 5am. The Government has extended the health emergency, restricting movement and public gatherings throughout the country until 10 March 2021.”

Lesser Antilles (Security threat level – 1): On 9 February 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice for St. Kitts and Nevis, which reads in part as follows: “For a period of 30 days from 7 February, travellers from the UK will not be allowed to enter St Kitts and Nevis. After the thirty-day Travel Advisory period, travellers from the UK will be required to quarantine inside their hotel room for the duration of their stay or mandatory 14-day quarantine. Whilst in quarantine, visitors will not be allowed to move freely around their hotel.”

Tanzania (Security threat level – 3): On 10 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam issued a Health Alert regarding the country’s rising number of COVID-19 cases, which reads in part as follows: “The U.S. Embassy is aware of a significant increase in the number of COVID-19 cases since January 2021. The practice of COVID-19 mitigation and prevention measures remains limited. The Tanzanian government has not released aggregate numbers on COVID-19 cases or deaths since April 2020. Healthcare facilities in Tanzania can become quickly overwhelmed in a healthcare crisis. Limited hospital capacity throughout Tanzania could result in life-threatening delays for emergency medical care.”

The full text of the alert is available here.

February 9, 2021

AMERICAS

Haiti (Security threat level – 4): On the afternoon of 8 February 2021, police officers and soldiers clashed with anti-government demonstrators near the National Palace in the Champ-de-Mars area of the capital Port-au-Prince. The protesters threw stones at security personnel and attempted to walk up the steps of the National Palace. Police officers fired live ammunition and tear gas canisters to repel the crowd; two journalists suffered gunshot wounds and were taken to a nearby hospital for treatment. President Jovenel Moise announced later that same day that he has retired the three Supreme Court justices selected by the opposition to lead a parallel government, despite not having the constitutional power to do so.

ASIA

Myanmar (Security threat level – 4): On 9 February 2021, large-scale protests continued throughout Myanmar for a fourth consecutive day. Multiple demonstrations occurred in Yangon, including in front of the U.S. Embassy, at the National League for Democracy headquarters and at the Hledan Junction Skyway located in western Yangon, amid a heavy security presence. There were no reports of protest-related violence in the city. Earlier in the day, in an effort to limit the size of protests, authorities closed the Thanlyin-Yangon, Theketa and Hliang Thar Yar bridges — which all lead to downtown Yangon — from 0400 to 0800 local time (2130 to 0130 UTC).

In the capital Naypyitaw, security forces fired live rounds into the air and used rubber bullets to disperse protesters after using water cannons unsuccessfully. At least six people suffered injuries, including two individuals who were hospitalized in critical condition. In Mandalay, security forces used tear gas to disperse a large demonstration after several unsuccessful attempts with water cannons. Security forces also arrested approximately 100 to 200 protesters, including one journalist. In Bago, a city located approximately 60 km (38 mi) northeast of Yangon, security personnel also used water cannons to disperse a large demonstration. Protests were also reported in the cities of Magway, Monywa and Pathein.

EUROPE

France (Security threat level – 3): At approximately 1100 local time (1000 UTC) on 8 February 2021, an Embraer Phenom 100 — registration number 9H-FAM — operated by Luxwing landed at Paris–Le Bourget Airport (LFPB/LBG) without deploying its landing gear. The aircraft, en route from Italy’s Venice Marco Polo Airport (LIPZ/VCE), skidded along the runway before coming to rest in a section of grass. A small fire broke out, but was quickly extinguished by emergency workers. The three people aboard the aircraft reportedly suffered minor injuries. Authorities have launched an investigation into the crash.

Netherlands (Security threat level – 2): On 8 February 2021, the Dutch government extended a countrywide 2100 to 0430 local time (2000-0330 UTC) nightly curfew through the morning of 3 March in a continued effort to stem the rapid spread of COVID-19. The curfew caused several days of unrest across the Netherlands after it was initially enacted on 23 January. Police officers are enforcing the curfew and issuing citations to violators; nearly 7,000 people were fined during the previous week. A countrywide lockdown is also in effect until at least 2 March, although businesses are now allowed to offer curbside pick-up services. The government is scheduled to review current lockdown measures on 23 February. Detailed information regarding measures employed to combat the spread of COVID-19 is available here.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Chile (Security threat level – 2): On 8 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Santiago issued a Health Alert following adjustments to city-level quarantine measures, which reads in part as follows: “As of February 8, the Ministry of Health has confirmed 755,350 cases of COVID-19 in Chile. The government of Chile has implemented measures to limit the spread of COVID-19. The following new measures were announced by the Chilean government on February 8:

  • The imposition of a quarantine for the following comunas (begins Thursday, February 11 at 5:00 am): Vichuquén (VII Region), Empedrado (VII Region), Parral (VII Region), Purén (IX Region), Collipulli (IX Region), Melipeuco (IX Region), Loncoche (IX Region)
  • The upgrading of the following comunas from Phase 1 (Quarantine) to Phase 2 (Transition). This includes the lifting of quarantine Monday-Friday (begins Thursday, February 11 at 5:00 am): Huara (I Region), San Vicente (VI Region), Romeral (VII Region), Curicó (VII Region), Maule (VII Region), Molina (VII Region), Teno (VII Region), San Javier (VII Region), Tomé (VIII Region), Coronel (VIII Region), Hualpén (VIII Region), Penco (VIII Region), Talcahuano (VIII Region), Chiguayante (VIII Region), Hualqui (VIII Region), San Pedro de la Paz (VIII Region), Concepción (VIII Region), Nacimiento (VIII Region), Mulchén (VIII Region), Negrete (VIII Region), Galvarino (IX Region), Temuco (IX Region), Vilcún (IX Region), Valdivia (XIV Region), Paillaco (XIV Region)
  • The upgrading of the following comunas from Phase 2 (Transition) to Phase 3 (Preparation). This includes the lifting of quarantine on the weekends and holidays (Thursday, Feburary 11 at 5:00 am): Concón (V Region), Villa Alemana (V Region), Quilpué (V Region), Recoleta (RM), Santiago Centro (RM), La Florida (RM), San Ramón (RM), La Granja (RM), La Pintana (RM), Puente Alto (RM), Machalí (VI Region), Freire (IX Region), Angol (IX Region)
  • The upgrading of the following comunas from Phase 3 (Preparation) to Phase 4 (Initial Opening). This the resumption of indoor dining in restaruants, as well as the reopening of theaters and cinemas with limited capacity (begins Monday, February 8 at 5:00 am): San Pedro (RM), Tiltil (RM), Alhué (RM)
  • The downgrading of the following comunas from Phase 3 (Preparation) to Phase 2 (Transition). This includes the reimposition of quarantines on the weekends and holidays (begins Thursday, February 11 at 5:00 am): La Ligua (V Region), Doñihue (VI Region), Palmilla (VI Region), San Nicolás (XVI Region), Contulmo (VIII Region), Tucapel (VIII Region), Carahue (IX Region).”

Democratic Republic Of The Congo (Security threat level – 4): On 8 February 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice regarding Ebola virus disease in North Kivu province, which reads in part as follows: “On 7 February 2021, a new case of Ebola was confirmed in Biena health zone, in North Kivu province in eastern DRC, in the same province as a previous outbreak. This is the first Ebola case reported since the last outbreak in Equateur Province was declared over on 18 November 2020.

“Further information and updates on Ebola can be found on the WHO website. ”

Niger (Security threat level – 5): On 8 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Niamey issued a Demonstration Alert regarding protests planned through 16 February, which reads in part as follows: “Starting tomorrow February 9th, and continuing until February 16th, there will be planned student demonstrations throughout Niamey. Most of these annual demonstrations will commence at the University of Niamey and ending at Yantala Cemetery. There may be a corresponding increase in police presence and traffic delays on major routes throughout town. Please exercise caution and plan alternate routes.”

The full text of the alert is available here.

Sweden (Security threat level – 2): On 8 February 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice for Sweden, which reads in part as follows: “From 6 February until 31 March all foreign nationals, including from the UK, must provide a negative COVID-19 test before entering Sweden. The Swedish Border Police accept tests from an authorised provider including those on this list. This test must be taken within 48 hours of arrival in Sweden. British citizens who live in Sweden and those travelling for urgent family reasons are exempt from this requirement. A full list of exemptions is available on the website of the Swedish Government. Further information is available on the website of the Swedish Police Authority.”

February 8, 2021

AMERICAS

Chile (Security threat level – 2): During 5-6 February 2021, rioting occurred in the town of Panguipulli as well as in the Maipú and Puente Alto communes of the Santiago metropolitan region after a video circulated on social media on 5 February showing a police officer shooting and killing a street performer in Panguipulli, which is located approximately 825 km (510 mi) south of the capital Santiago. On 5 February, rioters set fire to a municipal building in the center of Panguipulli, which later spread to consume 10 municipal buildings, including the post office, the civil registry, a local court and a water management company. Earlier in the day, demonstrators also set up barricades on the streets and clashed with police officers. In Maipú, located southwest of central Santiago, approximately 60 rioters assaulted a police station and clashed with police officers. At least two people were detained. Meanwhile, in Puente Alto, located southeast of the city center, demonstrators set fire to a Transantiago bus.

Haiti (Security threat level – 4): During the early hours of 8 February 2021, Justice Joseph Mécène Jean Louis, the oldest judge on Haiti’s Supreme Court, stated in an online video that he has accepted the position of provisional president as announced by opposition leaders. In response, security personnel have established a cordon surrounding the building that houses the Supreme Court, located in the Champ de Mars area of the capital city Port-au-Prince. Haiti’s minister of justice announced on 7 February that security forces foiled a planned coup d’etat and arrested 23 people, including Ivickel Dabrésil, a member of the Supreme Court — who authorities allege would have become the president had the coup succeeded — as well as the inspector general of the National Police. The opposition claims that President Jovenel Moise’s term legally ended on 7 February; Moise took office in February 2017, more than one year after winning a disputed election in 2016, and asserts that his five-year term ends in February 2022. In response to developments in Haiti, authorities in the Dominican Republic have increased the number of military troops at the shared border with Haiti.

ASIA

Myanmar (Security threat level – 4): As of 8 February 2021, largely peaceful protests against the 1 February military coup, which have occurred daily since at least 5 February, are ongoing and continue to increase in size. On 8 February the largest demonstration to date occurred in Yangon as protesters also gathered in other cities nationwide. Meanwhile, authorities in Mandalay, the country’s second largest city, imposed movement restrictions in seven areas.

On 8 February demonstrators rallied in Yangon, the capital Naypyidaw and other cities. In Yangon, reports indicate that as many as 100,000 demonstrators gathered near City Hall on the banks of the Yangon River. In Naypyidaw, at least 20,000 protesters rallied at the ThaPyayKnone roundabout. Police officers deployed a water cannon in an unsuccessful attempt to disperse the demonstrators, injuring at least one person. In the city of Myawaddy, police officers fired into the air to disperse demonstrators. Reports indicate that demonstrations also occurred in Bago, Loikaw, Mandalay, Moulmein, Sule and Ye. In related developments, authorities imposed movement restrictions in the following seven areas of Mandalay until further notice: Aung Myay Tharzan, Maha Aung Myay, Amarapura, Patheingyi, Pyigyitakon, Chan Aye Tharzan and Chan Myay Tharzi. Under the order, gatherings are limited to five people and a nightly curfew is in effect during 2000-0400 local time (1330-2130 UTC).

On 7 February approximately 60,000 demonstrators rallied in Yangon. An estimated 1,000 people protested in Naypyidaw, with demonstations also reported in Mandalay and other cities across the country. The demonstrations were largely peaceful. The previous day, approximately 2,000 demonstrators rallied near Yangon University to demand the release of State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi and President Win Myint. Police officers blocked the main entrance to the university; however, no violence was reported. Similar demonstrations also occurred in two other sections of Yangon and in the city of Mandalay.

EUROPE

Greece (Security threat level – 3): On 7 February 2021, Greek authorities extended the ongoing coronavirus-related restrictions for international flights until at least 0600 local time (0400 UTC) on 22 February. Flights from most countries outside of the EU will remain banned, and foreign travelers allowed to enter Greece — which include those arriving from EU member states and select countries deemed low risk for COVID-19 — will remain subject to current entry requirements. Travelers are required to submit a Passenger Locator Form and proof of negative results from a COVID-19 PCR test performed within 72 hours before arrival. Authorities may administer random tests upon entry. In addition, those arriving in Greece are required to self-quarantine for seven days. Domestic flights within Greece will remain restricted to travel for essential purposes until 0600 local time on 15 February. Meanwhile, as of 6 February, restrictions have been enhanced in the regions of Attica — which encompasses the capital Athens — Thessaloniki and Halkidiki until 15 February. An existing nightly curfew begins three hours earlier at 1800 local time on weekends, while the curfew remains in effect from 2100-0500 local time on weekdays. In addition, only essential businesses, such as gas stations, grocery stores and pharmacies, are permitted to remain open from 0700 to 1700 local time on weekends. These measures were enacted following an escalation in the number of COVID-19 cases and subsequent hospitalizations since 2 February.

United Kingdom (Security threat level – 3): On 8 February 2021, authorities in the U.K. lowered the national terrorism threat level to “substantial,” which indicates that an attack is likely. The “substantial” level is the third-highest alert on a five-tier scale. The terrorism threat level in the U.K. was raised to “severe” on 3 November 2020, following a terrorist attack in central Vienna, Austria’s capital, which left four people dead.

Additional details regarding threat levels in the U.K. are available here.

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Somalia (Security threat level – 5): On 6 February 2021, an improvised explosive device (IED) detonated and struck an armored vehicle traveling near the KM4 Junction in Mogadishu. The blast — which reportedly targeted a prominent businessman — occurred near the Afrik Hotel, which al-Shabab militants attacked on 31 January. The explosion killed one person and wounded three others. While no group has claimed responsibility for the attack, it is consistent with similar attacks by al-Shabab.

Analyst Comment: The pattern of recent attacks by al-Shabab — including the earlier attack on the hotel — strongly indicates that the militant group is trying to exploit uncertainty over Somalia’s upcoming elections by targeting key political and military leaders. Organizations working with the Somali government or near government buildings should monitor the situation closely and travelers should exercise extreme caution in anticipation of future attacks.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Cuba (Security threat level – 2): On 5 February 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice for Cuba to include information regarding a coronavirus-related nightly curfew in the capital Havana, which reads in part as follows: “From Friday 5 February 2021, a curfew is in place in Havana between 9pm to 5am which applies to any movement of vehicles and persons. The only permitted exceptions are for the transport of essential workers and supplies, and certain other categories with official permission.”

Slovakia (Security threat level – 2): On 5 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Bratislava issued a Health Alert regarding COVID-19 measures, which reads in part as follows: “Current Situation in Slovakia: Starting Monday, February 8, Slovakia will adopt the COVID-19 Traffic Light System, which will update pandemic control measures regionally based on predetermined criteria. An English-language explanation of the Traffic Light System is available here. Anyone physically present in a district in the black or dark red phase must carry with them outside their homes proof of a negative test less than 7 days old, a complete vaccination (two doses), or proof of recovery from COVID-19 not more than three months ago. As of February 5, all of Slovakia is in the black phase (highest level; few activities are allowed outside the home). For testing information and details on excepted activities, see the Covid-19 webpage of the U.S. Embassy in Bratislava. Current entry, exit, and transit requirements, including information about transit to the airport in Vienna, are also available at the Covid-19 webpage of the U.S. Embassy in Bratislava.”

February 5, 2021

ASIA

Malaysia (Security threat level – 3): On 4 February 2021, authorities announced new coronavirus-related restrictions for the upcoming Lunar New Year holiday. Residential gatherings are limited to members of the same household and public cultural activities are banned. As of 5 February, businesses such as night markets, hair salons and car washes may reopen subject to public health guidelines, including 1 meter (3 ft) social distancing and separate entry and exit points for patrons. As part of the existing Movement Control Order (MCO), which is in effect through 18 February for the entire country except for the state of Sarawak, interstate travel is banned. In Sarawak, which is under a less restrictive Conditional Movement Control Order (CMCO), state officials are allowed to adopt their own Lunar New Year guidelines.

EUROPE

Portugal (Security threat level – 2): As of 4 February 2021, Portuguese authorities are deploying emergency measures to maintain health care services across the Lisbon region as the country faces a surge in COVID-19 cases that has led to the highest death rate in Europe. Hospital officials in Lisbon — the capital — have approved the construction of a second field hospital with a 150-bed capacity, which is expected to open in mid-February. On 3 February military medics arrived from Germany to support Hospital da Luz, which is located in Lisbon. Additionally, government officials in Austria announced that the country will receive ICU patients from Portugal. In Portugal, the average daily number of COVID-19 cases is approximately 10 times the country’s previous peak during the spring of 2020, and 45% of the country’s total coronavirus-related deaths were recorded in January 2021.

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Mozambique (Security threat level – 4): On 4 February 2021, President Filipe Nyusi declared a nightly 2100-0400 local time (1900-0200 UTC) curfew from 5 February until at least 7 March in the Greater Maputo area to curb the spread of COVID-19. Additional new restrictions suspend all religious services, in-person learning, most private events and sporting events. Most commercial establishments are only allowed to operate during restricted business hours.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Chad (Security threat level – 5): On 4 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in N’Djamena issued a Demonstration Alert regarding planned protests, which reads in part as follows: “Planned civil demonstrations have been announced for February 4-7, 2021. Groups may protest the Chadian government and/or the election process.

“During the time leading up to Chadian elections in April 2021, other civil demonstrations can be expected.

“Recent protests have encountered a strong police/security force presence and the use of tear gas.

“U.S. government personnel are advised to avoid areas of large crowds or where demonstrations are forming or taking place.”

The full text of the alert is available here.

Chile (Security threat level – 2): On 4 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Santiago issued a Health Alert following the Chilean Ministry of Health’s adjustment to city-level quarantine measures, which reads in part as follows: “As of February 4, the Ministry of Health has confirmed 740,237 cases of COVID-19 in Chile. The government of Chile has implemented measures to limit the spread of COVID-19. The following new measures were announced by the Chilean government on February 4:

  • The imposition of a quarantine for the following comunas (begins Saturday, February 6 at 5:00 am): Tocopilla (II Region), Copiapó (III Region), Saavedra (IX Region), Toltén (IX Region), Hualaihué (X Region)
  • The upgrading of the following comunas from Phase 2 (Transition) to Phase 3 (Preparation). This includes the lifting of quarantine on the weekends and holidays (begins Monday, February 8 at 5:00 am): Estación Central (RM), Independencia (RM), Cerrillos (RM), Tiltil (RM), Padre Hurtado (RM), Paine (RM), Zapallar (V Region), Cabildo (V Region), Pelarco (VII Region)
  • The downgrading of the following comunas from Phase 3 (Preparation) to Phase 2 (Transition). This includes the reimposition of quarantines on the weekends and holidays (begins Saturday, February 6 at 5:00 am): San Pedro de Atacama (II Region), Paredones (VI Region), Pumanque (VI Region), Malloa (VI Region), Empedrado (VII Region), Hualañé (VII Region), Curepto (VII Region), Portezuelo (XVI Region), Pitrufquén (IX Region), Melipeuco (IX Region)
  • The upgrading of the following comunas from Phase 1 (Quarantine) to Phase 2 (Transition). This includes the lifting of quarantine Monday-Friday (begins Monday, February 8 at 5:00 am): Cañete (VIII Region), Tirúa (VIII Region), San Rosendo (VIII Region), Lumaco (IX Region).”

Haiti (Security threat level – 4): On 4 February 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince issued a Demonstration Alert, which reads in part as follows: “The political opposition group “Pitit Dessalinnes” intends to demonstrate on February 5th, 2021 beginning in Champ de Mars and ending in front of the U.S. Embassy. Additionally, opposition leaders have called for a nationwide protest on February 7th, 2021. The US Embassy will restrict non official travel of its direct-hire US Citizens staff to the immediate Embassy area. Please remain vigilant as large gatherings of this sort, while largely peaceful, can become unpredictable. Please avoid unnecessary travel in this area during this time.”

February 4, 2021

AMERICAS

Lesser Antilles (Security threat level – 1): On 3 February 2021, Prime Minister Allen Chastanet imposed a state of emergency with new restrictions until at least 10 February due to a surge in cases of COVID-19. Under the order, a nightly curfew from 1900 to 0500 local time (2300-0900 UTC) is in effect, while all nonessential businesses are required to remain closed. Additionally, from 10 February until further notice, all travelers to Saint Lucia will be required to submit a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within five days prior to arrival.

ASIA

Myanmar (Security threat level – 4): On 4 February 2021, the Ministry of Transport and Communications (MoTC) ordered telecommunications companies to block access to various social media platforms nationwide until at least 7 February. The government alleges that the platforms contributed to the country’s instability after they were used to organize demonstrations against the 1 February military coup. The country’s four telecommunications companies later announced that they complied with the order. The MoTC also announced plans to ban virtual private networks (VPNs), which can be used to circumvent the social media ban.

AUSTRALASIA

Australia (Security threat level – 2): On 4 February 2021, the government of Victoria state imposed new coronavirus-related restrictions until further notice, including a reinstatement of rules requiring face masks in public indoor settings and a reduction in the limit of household visitors to 15 from 30, in response to a COVID-19 outbreak. The new edict also recommends that face masks be worn when visitors are present in households other than their own. In related developments, the states of Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia will now require travelers from Melbourne – the capital of Victoria – to take a COVID-19 test and self-quarantine for 14 days upon entry. New South Wales and Tasmania will require travelers to take a COVID-19 test and self-isolate if they have been to a high-risk location listed by the Victoria Health Department. Travelers may enter the Australian Capital Territory if they have not traveled through an area with COVID-19 cases in the last 14 days.

EUROPE

Austria / Cyprus (Security threat levels – 2 / 2): On 2 February 2021, Austrian authorities announced that additional coronavirus-related measures will take effect on 8 February — after the current lockdown is lifted. Travelers must quarantine for 10 days upon arrival, show a negative COVID-19 result from a PCR or antigen test and fill out an online form. Exemptions are in place for cross-border commuters who must instead register with Austrian authorities and submit a negative PCR or antigen test result every seven days. Individuals who refuse to wear face masks or follow social distancing measures will be fined 90 euros (108 U.S. dollars).

Cypriot officials on 3 February amended coronavirus-related entry requirements for all passengers from countries designated by the government as Category A or B. Travelers from Category A or B countries must present a negative PCR test upon arrival and self-isolate for 72 hours. All travelers permitted to enter Cyprus must also complete a Cyprus Flight Pass form before arrival.

Greece (Security threat level – 3): On the afternoon of 4 February 2021, clashes broke out between police officers and demonstrators in central Athens, the capital, during a rally organized to protest a bill that would make changes to the university admission system and authorize the presence of special police forces on university campuses. A group of protesters threw a Molotov cocktail at police officers near the parliament building, prompting the officers to respond with tear gas. In addition, another group threw projectiles at police officers outside the nearby Bank of Greece, located on Panepistimiou Street. Meanwhile, in the northern city of Thessaloniki, protesters threw rocks and Molotov cocktails toward police officers, who deployed tear gas to disperse the crowd. Authorities reportedly detained multiple people in Thessaloniki. There were no reports of significant injuries in either city due to the clashes. Rally participants included university students, as well as members of teachers and parents unions, who oppose the education bill.

MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Kuwait (Security threat level – 2): On 3 February 2021, authorities announced that they will ban the entry of foreign nationals into the country from 7 to 21 February due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Officials stated that exceptions are limited to domestic workers and first-degree relatives of Kuwaiti nationals. In addition to the entry ban, on 3 February authorities also increased internal restrictions through 10 February, including closing gyms and hair salons and limiting business hours for malls and restaurants. Restaurants are now allowed to open from 0800 to 1700 local time (0500-1400 UTC), while malls are allowed to open from 1000 to 2000 local time.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Ghana (Security threat level – 3): On 4 February 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice regarding entry requirements, which reads in part as follows: “Kotoka International Airport is open. Commercial flights are operating to and from Ghana. Check with your travel company for the latest information. Land and sea borders remain closed. COVID-19 protocols at the airport may be subject to change as the new screening process evolves. See the guidance from the Ghana Civil Aviation Authority

“At present all passengers arriving are required by the Government of Ghana to:

  • Complete an online health declaration form pre-departure
  • Wear a face-mask throughout their flight and upon landing in Accra.
  • All passengers may also be asked to complete hard copy self-declaration forms on the flight, confirming they are fit to travel and providing details to facilitate contact tracing.
  • On arrival produce evidence of a negative Polymerise Chain Reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test result. This test must have taken place within 72 hours of departure. Children under the age of five are exempt.
  • You should not use the NHS testing service to get a test in order to facilitate your travel to another country. You should arrange to take a private test. For passengers who have transited other countries before arriving in Ghana the first country of departure will be the reference point.
  • Undergo a temperature check on arrival.
  • On arrival all passengers will be subject to a mandatory COVID-19 test at Kotoka International airport. The test is an antigen fluorescent immunoassay test and it will be conducted before baggage is collected at a cost of $150 per passenger. Payment should be made online prior to boarding. Children under the age of five are exempt. Children between the ages of five and 12 years will undergo testing on arrival free of charge. From 6 pm on February 8 testing for children between the ages of 5 and 12 years will no longer be free of charge and will also be at a cost of $150 per passenger.

“The Government of Ghana has stated results will be available within 30 minutes of the test taking place at the airport. As such passengers should be prepared for additional time to move through and exit the airport. During busy period when there may be a large number of passengers disembarking at the same time the testing area may become busy.”

Maldives (Security threat level – 3): On 4 February 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice for Maldives, which reads in part as follows: “A Public Health Emergency is in place until 5 March 2021. There is a curfew in the Greater Male’ area (which includes Male’, Vilimale’ and Hulhumale’) from 8:30pm to 4:30am local time. Between 8:30pm and 11pm (local time) vehicles are banned. There are no movement restrictions within the Greater Male’ area outside of these hours. Travel between the Greater Male’ region and other islands is no longer restricted to essential services only. When travelling from Greater Male’ (but not including the airport) to other islands, there is a mandatory 10-day home quarantine upon arrival at your destination. Use of masks is mandatory while travelling by air and sea.”

January 25, 2021

AMERICAS

Dominican Republic (Security threat level – 3): On 22 January 2021, authorities announced a loosening of existing coronavirus-related restrictions from 27 January to 8 February. A nightly curfew is in place from 1900 to 0500 local time (2300 to 0900 UTC) Monday through Friday and from 1700 to 0500 local time on Saturday and Sunday; a curfew grace period is in place for those in transit until 2200 local time Monday through Friday and until 2000 local time on Saturday and Sunday. Bars, restaurants and other food establishments remain prohibited from offering on-site dining, although they are allowed to offer takeaway or curbside options. All public religious activities remain suspended until further notice.

ASIA

India (Security threat level – 3): On 22 January 2021, following failed talks with the government, leaders of the ongoing farmers’ protest announced that they will hold a demonstration on 26 January to coincide with the country’s Republic Day holiday and use tractors to disrupt transportation along the Outer Ring Road in Delhi. Protest leaders declined the government’s proposal to temporarily suspend the implementation of three recently passed farm laws for 18 months, which prompted the demonstrations,.

Analyst Comment: Violence between protesters and police officers is possible during the event. Protest-related unrest occurred on several occasions since the demonstrations began in late-November 2020.

EUROPE

Belgium / Greece / Luxembourg / Norway / Spain (Security threat levels – 3 / 3 / 1 / 2 / 3): As of 25 January 2021, governments across Europe have imposed coronavirus-related restrictions as local COVID-19 cases surge. Additional details are provided below for Belgium, Greece, Luxembourg, Norway and Spain.

Belgian authorities on 22 January announced a ban on nonessential travel out of Belgium from 27 January until 1 March. Travel exceptions are in place for individuals with family emergencies, as well as for those with travel plans for business or study. Cross-border residents will be permitted to travel for a maximum of 48 hours without being subject to a quarantine period.

In Greece, the government on 22 January extended an existing requirement for all travelers arriving at Greek airports through 8 February to self-isolate for seven days upon arrival. The self-isolation requirement is in addition to the prerequisite to possess proof of a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours before boarding their flight and complete an online Passenger Locator Form no more than 24 hours before arrival. Details regarding protocol for individuals arriving into and departing Greece are available here. While authorities plan to reopen high schools on 1 February, the ongoing nationwide lockdown, including a ban on domestic travel, remains in effect until further notice. A nightly curfew from 2100 to 0500 local time (1900-0300 UTC) also remains in place.

In Luxembourg, Prime Minister Xavier Bettel on 22 January extended existing nationwide restrictions until 21 February. The measures were scheduled to expire on 31 January. Under the measures, restaurants and bars are required to remain closed. Meanwhile, private gatherings are limited to two people and public gatherings may have no more than 10 people; gatherings of 10 to 100 people are allowed as long as assigned seating and other social distancing guidelines are exercised.

In Norway, authorities on 23 January tightened coronavirus-related restrictions in the capital Oslo and the surrounding municipalities of Ås, Enebakk, Frogn, Indre Østfold, Moss, Nesodden, Nordre Follo, Våler and Vestby. Nonessential businesses, including restaurants, are required to close from 23 January until 1 February. Meanwhile, grocery stores, pharmacies, and gas stations will remain open. Additionally, all organized sports activities are suspended, and visits to private homes are banned.

In Spain, authorities in the autonomous region of Madrid also imposed additional coronavirus-related restrictions, which will be in effect from 25 January to 8 February. Under the new restrictions, all businesses deemed nonessential are required to close at 2100 local time (2000 UTC) nightly, a regionwide nightly curfew goes into effect at 2200 local time, and social gatherings are limited to up to four people. Additionally, regional authorities will extend a ban prohibiting movement of all residents and travelers into and out of 25 localities and 56 defined health zones within the region during the same time period. Separately, authorities in Valencia on 25 January extended existing regionwide coronavirus-related restrictions until 15 February.

Netherlands (Security threat level – 2): On the evening of 24 January 2021, demonstrations against recently enacted coronavirus-related measures turned violent in at least 10 Dutch cities, including Amsterdam and Eindhoven. In Amsterdam, police officials deployed a water cannon, dogs and officers on horseback to disperse a demonstration on the Museumplein, where demonstrators threw stones and fireworks at the officers. Authorities detained nearly 200 individuals in the city. Meanwhile, in Eindhoven, located approximately 125 km (80 mi) south of Amsterdam, rioters looted businesses and set fires near the Centraal train station after police officers forcibly cleared hundreds of demonstrators from the nearby Museum Square. Train service at the station was halted during the violence. Police officers detained at least 55 people in Eindhoven, where reports indicate that supporters of the PEGIDA anti-immigrant group were among those demonstrating.

Elsewhere in the Netherlands, rioters attempted to smash the windows of the MST hospital’s emergency department in Enschede, located approximately 160 km east of Amsterdam. Police officers used dogs and a baton charge to disperse the rioters. In Urk, located about 85 km northeast of Amsterdam, rioters broke into a COVID-19 testing facility and set it on fire. Additional demonstrations occurred in the cities of Almelo, Apeldoorn, Arnhem, Breda, Helmond, Oosterhout and Venlo. The violence occurred the day after a countrywide coronavirus-related 2100 to 0430 local time (2000-0330 UTC) nightly curfew went into effect.

MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Tunisia (Security threat level – 3): On 23 January 2021, authorities extended nationwide restrictions imposed to curb the spread of COVID-19 until 14 February. A nightly curfew from 2000 to 0500 local time (1900-0400 UTC) remains in place. Additionally, all private and public gatherings remain prohibited.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Belgium (Security threat level – 3): On 23 January 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice for Belgium, which reads in part as follows: “From 25 January, all travellers from the UK must quarantine for 10 days on arrival and take a test on the first and seventh day of their quarantine.”

Côte d’Ivoire (Security threat level – 4): On 25 January 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Abidjan issued an alert regarding an extension of the existing health state of emergency until at least 28 February; the alert reads in part as follows:

“Event: The Government of Côte d’Ivoire re-issued a Health State of Emergency from January 21 through February 28, calling for stronger enforcement of protective health measures. Social distancing and a reduction in non-essential movements are encouraged. Face masks/cloth face coverings remain mandatory in all public spaces, including vehicles.

“Since the start of the pandemic, Côte d’Ivoire has reported 26,850 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (24,762 recovered, 146 deceased, and 1,942 active) within its borders, as of January 24.

“Effective January 21, all inbound and outbound airline travelers to/from Côte d’Ivoire are required to present negative COVID-19 PCR test results dated no more than five days before their arrival/departure in country.”

The full text of the alert is available here.

January 22, 2021

AMERICAS

Ecuador (Security threat level – 3): On 21 January 2021, the mayor of Quito imposed new restrictions — in effect from 22 January through 7 February — to curb the spread of COVID-19. Under the new restrictions, private vehicles are barred from circulating through the city from 2300 to 0400 local time (0400-0900 UTC) nightly. Businesses such as supermarkets, shopping centers and restaurants are permitted to operate between the hours of 0600-2200 local time during this period.

EUROPE

Europe: On 21 January 2021, authorities reimposed a citywide lockdown in the capital Freetown and implemented a nationwide nightly curfew from 2200-0500 local time/UTC beginning on 25 January. Additionally, officials restricted entry and exit to and from the Western Area division, which encompasses Freetown; travelers are required to provide proof of negative results from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival, and must have received an electronic pass deeming their movements essential. Meanwhile, restaurants and bars must remain closed on weekends, and face masks are mandatory in all public places. The measures, which were prompted by a spike in confirmed COVID-19 cases, are expected to remain in place until at least 8 February.

In the Czech Republic, the government on 22 January extended an existing state of emergency until at least 14 February, which allows authorities to implement and extend coronavirus-related restrictions as necessary. Currently, nonessential shops, service providers and ski lift services are required to close.

In Denmark, authorities on 22 January suspended all flights from Dubai International Airport (OMDB/DXB) for five days due to perceived reliability issues regarding COVID-19 tests being administered in the emirate. Danish officials stated that some passengers arriving from the UAE were diagnosed with the new variants of COVID-19 after previously testing negative. An investigation is underway to determine the accuracy of the COVID-19 test used by the UAE.

French officials on 22 January announced that most travelers arriving from within the EU by air, sea or rail as of 24 January will be required to demonstrate a negative result from a PCR test taken within 72 hours before entering France. Exemptions for the new restriction include essential workers, cross border workers and truck drivers. Travelers from the EU will not be required to quarantine upon arrival.

In Spain, authorities in the autonomous Basque community announced on 22 January that a ban prohibiting movement of all residents and travelers into and out of municipalities across the region will commence on 25 January. Officials did not immediately provide details on whether exemptions will be considered or give an expected end date for the intercity travel ban. The Basque community has exceeded the central government’s threshold of 500 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 inhabitants during the last 14 days, which triggers additional public health restrictions.

In the U.K., officials in Northern Ireland on 21 January extended the nationwide lockdown until 5 March. During the lockdown, residents are legally required to stay indoors except for essential reasons, such as procuring food and medicine, traveling to work and school, or seeking medical care. Additionally, nonessential businesses are required to close, while hospitality businesses, including cafes and restaurants, are allowed to operate takeout and delivery services only. Alcohol sales for takeout are permitted from 0800 to 2000 local time/UTC Monday to Saturday and 1000-2000 local time on Sunday. These restrictions are scheduled for review on 18 February and could be further extended into early April 2021. Northern Ireland’s government maintains a database with comprehensive information regarding ongoing restrictions in the territory, which is available here.

On 21 January the Dutch parliament approved the government’s proposal to impose a countrywide nightly curfew. As of 23 January, the nightly curfew will begin at 2100 local time (2000 UTC), a half hour later than originally proposed, and remain in effect until 0430 local time. The curfew is currently scheduled to last through 10 February.

In Belgium, authorities on 20 January announced a fine of 250 euros (305 U.S. dollars) for individuals returning from areas defined as a red zone, or high-risk COVID-19 area, and fail to take a COVID-19 test. Travelers returning from a red zone country are required to test on the first and seventh days of arrival to Belgium. The fines will be generated automatically based on cross-referenced information the government receives from the Passenger Locator Form  — the form all individuals are required to complete upon arrival — to determine whether a traveler spent more than 48 hours in a foreign country as well as information from the COVID-19 test result database. A similar fine is in place for individuals who fail to comply with other coronavirus-related measures, including the ban on gatherings, social distancing guidelines and wearing a mask in public.

MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Lebanon (Security threat level – 4): On 21 January 2021, authorities extended the existing nationwide lockdown until 8 February to curb the spread of COVID-19; the measure was scheduled to expire on 1 February. Under the directive, a 24/7 total curfew is in effect with tightened restrictions that forbid residents from leaving their homes for nonessential purposes; violators risk being charged with unspecified fines. Supermarkets and restaurants are only permitted to operate via home delivery.

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Madagascar / Mozambique (Security threat levels – 3 / 4): As of 22 January 2021, rescue efforts remain ongoing following Tropical Cyclone Eloise’s landfall in northern Madagascar on 19 January. The northeastern Analanjirofo region was the most severely affected area, with officials reporting that approximately 1,600 individuals were displaced in the town of Maroantsetra alone. Mass displacements were also reported in the towns of Antalaha, Avaratra, Befandriana, Besalampy, Mahajanga I and II, Mitsinjo and Toamasina I, affecting approximately 2,600 people nationwide, with at least one confirmed fatality. Eloise also destroyed hundreds of homes across districts in northern Madagascar. The mayor of Beira, Mozambique, advised residents to seek shelter ahead of the cyclone’s expected landfall in the vicinity of the city on 23 January.

As of 1200 local time (0900 UTC) on 22 January, Tropical Cyclone Eloise was located approximately 830 km (515 mi) north of Maputo, Mozambique, and was moving west-southwest at 28 kph (17 mph), according to the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. At that time, Eloise was generating maximum sustained winds of 120 kph, with gusts of up to 148 kph. On its current forecast path, the storm will continue to track westward and strengthen before making landfall on 23 January near Beira. The storm will likely also affect Gaza, Inhambanem, Manica, Sofala and Zambezia provinces.

Sierra Leone (Security threat level – 4): On 21 January 2021, authorities reimposed a citywide lockdown in the capital Freetown and implemented a nationwide nightly curfew from 2200-0500 local time/UTC beginning on 25 January. Additionally, officials restricted entry and exit to and from the Western Area division, which encompasses Freetown; travelers are required to provide proof of negative results from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival, and must have received an electronic pass deeming their movements essential. Meanwhile, restaurants and bars must remain closed on weekends, and face masks are mandatory in all public places. The measures, which were prompted by a spike in confirmed COVID-19 cases, are expected to remain in place until at least 8 February.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Cabo Verde (Security threat level – 2): On 21 January 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Praia issued an Alert regarding the rising numbers of COVID-19 cases in Cabo Verde, which reads in part as follows: “As of January 20, Cabo Verde had a total of 698 known active COVID-19 cases. The active cases are on Santiago (262), São Vicente (303), Santo Antão (68), Fogo (37), Maio (24), Sal (2), and Boa Vista (2). Brava and Sao Nicolãu had no known active cases.Additional information is available at https://covid19.cv.

“State of Calamity Declared in São Vicente

“On January 19, the Government of Cabo Verde declared a “State of Calamity” for the island of São Vicente. All other islands remain under a “State of Contingency.” These designations place certain restrictions on businesses and public gatherings, including time restrictions on restaurant and bar operations. The November 5 mandate for face coverings in public spaces remains in effect. Exceptions include children under the age of ten and individuals with health conditions that prevent them from wearing a face covering. Anyone in violation of the law may be subject to a fine up to 15,000 CVE (approximately $158). U.S. citizens in Cabo Verde are reminded that all Cabo Verdean laws and regulations apply to them.”

The full text of the alert is available here.

Central African Republic (Security threat level – 5): On 21 January 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice regarding a state of emergency declaration, which reads in part as follows: “A 15-day state of emergency is in place across the country from 2300 GMT on 21 January. The Government of CAR has suspended use of all airspace by foreign governments and NGOs citing the security situation.”

Chile (Security threat level – 2): On 21 January 2021, U.S. Embassy in Santiago issued a Health Alert regarding the Chilean Ministry of Health’s adjustments to city-level quarantine measures, which reads in part as follows: “As of January 21, the Ministry of Health has confirmed 685,107 cases of COVID-19 in Chile. The government of Chile has implemented measures to limit the spread of COVID-19. The following new measures were announced by the Chilean government on January 21:

  • The imposition of a quarantine for the following comunas (begins Saturday, January 23 at 5:00 am): Pozo Almonte (I Region), Talca (VII Region), Chillán (XVI Region), Chillán Viejo (XVI Region), Tirúa (VIII Region), Los Álamos (VIII Region), Lebu (VIII Region), Lumaco (IX Region), Traiguén (IX Region), Nueva Imperial (IX Region), Cholchol (IX Region), Río Negro (X Region), San Juan de la Costa (X Region), Puyehue (X Region)
  • The upgrading of the following comunas from Phase 1 (Quarantine) to Phase 2 (Transition). This includes the removal of quarantine from Monday-Friday (begins Monday, January 25 at 5:00 am): Los Ángeles (VIII Region), Renaico (IX Region), Angol (IX Region)
  • The upgrading of the following comunas from Phase 2 (Transition) to Phase 3 (Preparation). This includes the lifting of quarantine on the weekends and holidays (begins Monday, January 25 at 5:00 am). San José de Maipo (RM), La Ligua (V Region), Cochrane (XI Region)
  • The downgrading of the following comunas from Phase 3 (Preparation) to Phase 2 (Transition). This includes the reimposition of quarantines on the weekends and holidays (begins Saturday, January 23 at 5:00 am): Huara (I Region), Tocopilla (II Region), Cabildo (V Region), Paine (RM), Rengo (VI Region), Coltauco (VI Region), Pelarco (VII Region), Colbún (VII Region), Corral (XIV Region), Lanco (XIV Region), Coyhaique (XI Region).”

Norway (Security threat level – 2): On 21 January 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Oslo issued a Demonstration Alert regarding scheduled protests near the U.S. Embassy in the Huseby neighborhood, which reads in part as follows: “A demonstration is planned to take place at the U.S. Embassy in Oslo off of Sørkedalsveien in the Huseby neighborhood on Friday, January 22, 2021 beginning at approximately 2:30 p.m. The Embassy anticipates 50 demonstrators; local police will direct them to protest in a designated area away from the Embassy grounds. This designated area is a grassy field located approximately 100 meters northeast of the Embassy. The start times and number of demonstrators involved in demonstrations are variable. Furthermore, while most demonstrations in Oslo are coordinated with local police and remain peaceful, even demonstrations expected to be non-violent are unpredictable and can escalate into violence. Accordingly, U.S. citizens are advised to proceed with caution and consider avoiding the area around U.S. Embassy until 6:30 p.m. Remember to maintain vigilance and situational awareness.? If you are a victim of a crime, or if you feel threatened, please call the police emergency number (112) for immediate assistance.”

Russia (Security threat level – 3): On 22 January 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Moscow issued a Demonstration Alert, which reads in part as follows: “Event: Media sources indicate that on Saturday, January 23, demonstrations are being planned throughout Russia in support of an opposition activist. These demonstrations are likely to be unauthorized. Given the likely substantial police presence and possible dispersal of demonstrators into other areas of the cities, U.S. citizens should avoid these demonstrations and any demonstration-related activities.”

The full text of the alert – which includes details of protests in major cities – can be read here.

January 21, 2021

AMERICAS

Guatemala (Security threat level – 4): On 20 January 2021, authorities introduced additional nationwide coronavirus-related restrictions in response to the rising number of local COVID-19 cases, effective immediately. Municipal markets are allowed to remain open from 0600 to 1400 local time (1200 to 2000 UTC), with exclusive hours set aside for individuals older than 60 years of age. Alcohol cannot be sold from 2100 to 0400 local time. Fairs are banned, as well as wakes and mass burials.

ASIA

Malaysia / Australia / China (Security threat levels – 3 / 2 / 3): On 21 January 2021, Malaysian authorities extended the Movement Control Order (MCO) in the states of Johor, Kelantan, Melaka, Penang, Sabah and Selangor as well as the Federal Territories of Kuala Lumpur, Putrajaya and Labuan through 4 February; the restrictions were scheduled to expire on 26 January. Additionally, the MCO will be in effect 22 January through 4 February in the states of Kedah, Pahang, Perak, Perlis, Negeri Sembilan and Terengganu. Under the MCO, residents are prohibited from traveling beyond 10 km (6.2 mi) of their home, interstate travel is prohibited, social activities such as weddings and public prayers are banned, and restaurants are allowed to provide takeout services only. Essential businesses — such as grocery stores, banks and medical facilities — are allowed to operate normally, while businesses involved in manufacturing, construction, trade and agriculture are permitted to continue operating at reduced capacity. Violators of the order are subject to a 1,000 Malaysian ringgit (250 U.S. dollar) fine.

As of 22 January, and until further notice, all international travelers entering Australia must demonstrate a negative result from a COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to departure. Additionally, face masks will be required for all international flights. Further details, including exemptions, are available here.

In China, authorities in the capital Beijing imposed on 20 January a partial lockdown of the city’s Daxing district until further notice due to new cases of COVID-19. Under the mandate, residents of the district are not allowed to travel beyond the district’s borders, unless they receive permission from officials and test negative for the virus within three days prior to travel. Additionally, gatherings of more than 50 people are banned and residents of five neighborhoods are not allowed to leave their homes. Operations at Beijing Daxing International Airport (ZBAD/PKX) appear to be unaffected by the orders.

EUROPE

Netherlands (Security threat level – 2): On 20 January 2021, the Dutch government introduced additional nationwide restrictions in an effort to stem the spread of COVID-19, citing concerns regarding new, more infectious variants of the coronavirus. As of 23 January, all inbound flights to the Netherlands from the U.K., South Africa and Cabo Verde will be banned, in addition to those from the following South American countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay and Venezuela. The ban is expected to remain in effect for at least one month. Additionally, all travelers arriving at airports in the Netherlands will be required to demonstrate a negative result from a rapid (antigen/LAMP) COVID-19 test taken no more than four hours before boarding their flight; the same requirement will also apply to those arriving aboard water vessels from areas deemed high risk for COVID-19. The new requirement is in addition to an existing requirement to possess proof of a negative result from a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands. The government has also proposed a 2030 to 0430 local time (1930-0330 UTC) nightly curfew, which is in debate in the House of Representatives. The nightly curfew, if ratified, is expected to go into effect on 22 January and last until 10 February. The Netherlands remains under a countrywide lockdown, which is scheduled to expire on 9 February. Further details regarding the newly introduced restrictions as outlined by the Dutch government are available here.

United Kingdom (Security threat level – 3): As of 21 January 2021, widespread flooding continues across parts of England and Wales following heavy rains that accompanied a powerful storm and is forcing the evacuation of thousands of homes and businesses. In Greater Manchester, approximately 2,000 buildings were evacuated in the East Didsbury, West Didsbury and Northenden areas on the night of 20 January due to rising water levels in the River Mersey. Officials also advised residents in the town of Maghull, located in Merseyside county, to evacuate their properties due to severe flood warnings. Meanwhile, in Wales, the flooding forced the evacuation of residents in the northern towns of Ruthin and Bangor-on-Dee in the early hours of 21 January. Train services have been severely disrupted in Cheshire, Greater Manchester, Lancashire and Merseyside; however, there have been no reports of significant injuries or deaths so far. Meteorologists forecast additional heavy rains in the region next week, which will likely cause further flooding and disruptions.

MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Iraq (Security threat level – 5): On the morning of 21 January 2021, two suicide bombings occurred at a crowded open-air market in Tayaran Square, located in central Baghdad. Reports indicate that an assailant entered the market, claimed to be sick and asked for help, then detonated the explosives. Another assailant then arrived at the scene on a motorcycle and detonated an explosives-laden belt. According to the minister of health, at least 32 people were killed and 110 others were wounded in the blasts. Authorities mobilized medical and security personnel across the Baghdad area following the bombings. Iraqi officials shut down the Green Zone shortly after the attack as a precautionary measure.

Analyst Comment: The death toll is expected to increase, as many of the wounded are in critical condition. No group immediately claimed responsibility for the bombings, although Iraqi military officials noted that the Islamic State (IS) group likely perpetrated the attack. The group conducted similar attacks in Baghdad in the past, but such bombings have become increasingly rare in the city over the past three years. In January 2018, two suicide bombers detonated explosive devices at Tayaran Square, killing 38 people and wounding 105 others. IS claimed responsibility for that attack.

GOVERNMENT WARNINGS

Djibouti (Security threat level – 3): On 21 January 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Djibouti City issued a Security Alert regarding an attack in Tadjoura, which reads in part as follows:

“Event: On the night of 14 January 2021, unknown assailants attacked the Gendarmerie Brigade Office in Tadjoura. Isolated incidents like this have occurred in previous pre-election cycles but it is unclear whether this event represents a politically motivated attack.

“In the lead up to the April Djiboutian Presidential Election, American Citizens are advised to exercise increased vigilance and caution and to be aware of their surroundings.”

“The full text of the alert is available here.

Lesser Antilles (Security threat level – 1): On 20 January 2021, the U.K. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) issued updated travel advice for St. Kitts and Nevis, which reads in part as follows: “St. Kitts and Nevis have temporarily suspended British Airways flights from the UK until the end of March 2021. If you are booked on a British Airways flight, you should contact the British Airways Contact Centre at 1877 767 7970 or speak to your travel agent.”

Mozambique (Security threat level – 4): On 21 January 2021, the U.S. Embassy in Maputo issued a Weather Alert regarding Tropical Cyclone Eloise, which reads in part as follows:

“Location: Central Coast of Mozambique

“Event: Tropical Cyclone Eloise is currently expected to make landfall near Beira late on Friday, January 22. Expect torrential rains and strong winds with possible flooding, landslides, power outages, impassable roads, and difficult travel conditions. The storm could track to the north or south; prepare for increased rainfall levels and winds throughout the coast of Mozambique.’

The full text of the alert is available here.